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SUCCESSFUL ROUTING
Intro
Routing Safety
Router Bits
General Routing
Mortises
Dovetails
Horizontal Routing

Successful Routing (continued)
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version of Tip - Pg. 1-3, Pg. 4-6, Pg. 7-9

General Routing

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Figure 10-2. The distance from the outer edge of the workpiece to the bit determines the setup. Click on image for larger view.

When routing, the distance from the outer edge of the workpiece to the bit determines the setup:

  • When workpiece edge is 1" or less from bit, use one feather board on the infeed side and an additional feather board on the outfeed side, both secured in the table slot. Use a push stick, or when it's necessary to push work-piece underneath the shield, use a piece of wood (Figure 10-2A).
  • When workpiece edge is 1" to 2-3/4" from bit, use two feather boards as above or use one feather board centered to the bit, secured in table slot. Use a push stick or piece of wood to push the workpiece under the shield (Figure 10-2B).
  • When workpiece edge is 2-3/4" to 5-1/2" from bit, use one feather board centered to the bit and secured to table with two C-clamps. Use a push block (Figure 10-2C).
  • When routing across the grain of workpieces up to 10" wide, use the miter gauge and safety grip. Workpiece must extend 5-1/2" away from bit (Figure 10-2D).
  • When routing an oversize workpiece, use a push block (Figure 10-2E).

Router cuts made with the grain are smoother than cross grain or against the grain cuts, but you can't always work that way. When you can't, work with a slower feed rate and less depth of cut for optimum results.

  • The depth of single pass cuts should be limited as follows:
  • 1/4" maximum depth of cut for bits up to 1/2" diameter.
  • 1/8" maximum depth of cut for bits over 1/2" diameter.
  • Less than the above limits when routing extremely hard wood.
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Figure 10-3. Feed the workpiece from left to right against the bit's direction of rotation. A slow feed with a shallow depth of cut will produce the best results.

Feed the workpiece from left to right against the bit's direction of rotation (Figure 10-3). The action of the properly installed bit will help keep the workpiece against the fence.

When using auxiliary facings, it is a good idea to remember that when the fence is behind the bit, the pass is also made from left to right.

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Figure 10-4. Make cross grain cuts by working with the miter gauge and safety grip.

Make cross grain cuts by working with the miter gauge and safety grip (Figure 10-4). Some chipping will occur where the bit breaks through, so allow for it by making the cut on an extra-wide piece. Then you can remove the chipped edge using the table saw or jointer.

 

 

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Figure 10-5. Construction details of the auxiliary facing.

Stock edges are often routed to form rabbets. For this and similar kinds of work, make an auxiliary facing, as shown in Figure 10-5, that can be attached to the rip fence as shown in Figure 10-6. The relief area allows adjustments so the bit can project beyond the bearing surface of the facing. The depth of cut is controlled by quill extension; width of cut is controlled by how much the bit projects. If you need a wider cut, move the table or reposition the fence and make another pass.

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Figure 10-6. An auxiliary facing that can be bolted to the rip fence is a must for many routing operations. The relief area allows for setting the bit so cuts like the rabbet can be make.

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